Hydrotherapy



What is Hydrotherapy?


Hydrotherapy is the use of exercise therapy within a specially designed heated pool to target and treat a wide spectrum of conditions. These include general joint pain, orthopaedic conditions, neurological conditions, treatment post orthopaedic surgeries such as hip and back and many more.

The use of gentle, controlled movements within the warm water heated up to 31-35 degrees gives the opportunity to steadily progress in one’s physiotherapy regime within a safe, comfortable and enjoyable environment. Whilst being less strenuous, it focuses on guided, controlled, pain–free movements.

Although the benefits from Hydrotherapy are many, the top health benefits are the following:

Minimises Aches and Pains - The warmth of the water relaxes muscular spasm which also helps in increasing circulation.

Gains Strength - Hydrotherapy can help strengthen weak muscles. Resistance provided by the water itself helps to strengthen weak musculature. Exercises can be progressed by increasing the speed of movement or by increasing surface area by introducing various special forms of floats.

Increases flexibility - The increased temperature of the water helps in relaxing tight musculature with the resulting increase in range of movement of any particular joint.

Minimal Impact on Joints - A hydrotherapy pool provides the opportunity to exercise whilst supporting and taking the weight of the user enabling them to move more freely.

Turbulence: Currents in the water contribute towards providing an unstable environment which in itself helps towards strengthening stabiliser muscles of the body. This makes it a very useful tool to challenge and retrain balance.

At Marlborough School we have developed our own hydrotherapy award system where students work on a variety of areas such as floating, movement, breath control, rolling over, standing and walking.  For students that have passed through our award system we use the STA Rockhopper series which works on confidence in the water and learning swimming strokes.

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